Frequently Asked Questions

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When entering the process of getting dentures or denture implants for the first time, it can seem like a complicated and daunting procedure.  Advanced Technique Denture Centre Ltd. has experienced staff to answer any questions you may have about the process. This guide of Frequently Asked Questions will help get you started in finding your answers to questions you may have.  For any unanswered questions, don't hesitate to contact our office.

  1. Why go to a Denturist?
  2. How long do dentures last?
  3. Do dentures need to be replaced?
  4. Now that I have dentures, do I need an annual exam?
  5. How should I care for my dentures?
  6. What should you do if your dentures crack or break?
  7. Why can't you fix dentures that break with glue?
  8. Will a partial denture change the way I speak?
  9. I am a new denture wearer - what should I expect?
  10. What are the most common denture related problems?

1. Why go to a Denturist?

At Advanced Technique Denture Centre we understand that we are not only replacing your natural teeth, but you are trusting us with your smile, appearance and your looks. The Denturist at our office is trained in design, construction, insertion and adjustment of removable dentures as well as dentures over implants. The Denturist at Advanced Technique Denture Centre regularly attends denture conferences and courses to keep up with recent advances in denture technology to ensure you are provided with the best possible treatment for your needs. We offer a free consultation to meet with us, have a preliminary examination, discuss treatment options and ask any questions you may have.

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2. How long do dentures last?

Your dentures will not last a lifetime. The denture teeth and the base will wear and stain over time. The oral tissues are undergoing continual change so that dentures will have to be adjusted, relined and remade from time to time. The time in between replacement dentures will vary and depend upon factors such as individual tolerances, habits of the denture wearer and the length of time you have worn dentures. The average life of a denture is about five to seven years.

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3. Do dentures need to be replaced?

Dentures will need to be relined and remade due to normal wear and tear and normal shrinking of your gums over a period of time. Relines should be completed every two to three years and new dentures are usually recommended every five to seven years.

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4. Now that I have dentures, do I need an annual exam?

Your dentures and your tissues should be checked annually. Oral tissues can sustain damage without you even being aware that it is occuring. It is important to detect and eliminate tissue inflamation to minimize shrinkage of the supporting bone and tissues. We will also check for looseness of the denture due to tissue changes, stains and calculus deposits on the denture and your bite position. It is not the dentures that change over time, it is your mouth which is continually changing. A denture cannot do its job properly for more than five to seven years. Wearing dentures that are much older can cause changes in your mouth that are often irreversible.

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5. How should I care for my dentures?

Clean your dentures gently. You can use a soft toothbrush. Always keep brushing to a minimum. To clean your denture, remove the denture to brush it with your toothpaste. Be sure to support the denture evenly while brushing. When cleaning your dentures, do so over a sink partially full of water. This will serve to minimize breakage in the event that you accidentally drop your dentures. Never use hot water as this will warp your dentures. Lukewarm water from the tap will do just fine. Keep dentures in clean, cold water when they are not being worn. There are also inexpensive electro sonic denture baths and specialty cleaning products available from our office. These products are generally very economical and remove the need to brush. Denture teeth are just as susceptible to the destructive effects of plaque as natural teeth. Once plaque hardens into calculus, it can lead to bacterial problems, gum disease and irritations and a range of digestive problems. Daily denture care and an annual professional cleaning will help to maintain your oral health and appearance.

Each time you remove your dentures for cleaning, some attention should be given to your gums and ridges. Using a clean finger, massage your gums, both upper and lower, for serveral minutes. This can also be done using a clean, soft toothbrush. This stimulates blood flow to the area which helps promote healthy gums and can prevent decay. You can also rinse your mouth once a day with warm salt water to heal any chafing or rubbing caused by the dentures or daily activities.

Removing your dentures each night to allow the tissue and oral structures supporting the dentures some rest. It has been proven that patients who never remove their dentures have a higher risk of oral cancer, an increased bacterial count in the mouth, and excessive damage to the tissue and ridges that result in premature looseness of the dentures. Medication can affect denture fit and comfort. Discuss all prescription and non-prescription medications with us.

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6. What should you do if your dentures crack or break?

Call your denturist immediately. While we have used the best materials available in the construction of your dentures, this does not mean that they are indestructible. If too much force is put upon them they will break. Most often dentures can be repaired quickly, often on the same day. Damaged dentures can cause additional oral health problems so it is important to see your denturist as soon as possible. Never attempt to repair your dentures yourself. They require professional repair and adjustment. In the event that you cannot find the time to make an appointment immediately, the broken denture will either have to be tolerated for a while, or if it causes serious discomfort or no longer fucntions, you will need to stop wearing it. It is a good idea to have a duplicate set of dentures made or to save your last set of dentures as a back-up.

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7. Why can't you fix dentures that break with glue?

Glues often contain harmful or poisonous chemicals and are not effective in the proper repair of dentures.

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8. Will a partial denture change the way I speak?

Your partial denture may help your speech. It can be difficult to speak clearly when you are missing teeth. However, it also will take time to get used to it.

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9. I am a new denture wearer - what should I expect?

When you get a new denture you may experience many temporary effects such as interference with speech to an inability to chew, loss of appetite or slight pain. An adjustment period to new dentures is normal and it is important to remember that many other denture patients have experienced and have overcome these troubles.

During this adjustment period (up to six months after denture insertion), you will attend at our office for regular care. The length of this adjustment period will vary according to your mouth conditions, general state of health, age, and ability to adapt to new conditions. As needed, we can examine the fit and bite of your dentures.

Please remember that we will not send you home with new dentures unless we are satisfied that they fit you properly. In time and with consistent use, your dentures will fit comfortably and fucntion well.

Common effects felt by new denture patients are as follows:

  1. Feeling of looseness
    As you adjust to your dentures, your tonque and cheek muscles will attempt to repel them as they would any foreign body, and these efforts may result in a sensation of a loose denture. In time and as the dentures settle into place, these muscles will stop trying to expel your dentures and aid in holding them in place. At this time you will notice a definite improvement in the fit. During the adjustment period, close your mouth and lips and suck gently on your dentures to overcome this feeling of looseness.

  2. Soreness
    The tissues of your mouth are among the most sensitive of your body and some time may pass before they become completely adjusted to the presence of your new dentures. During this time, it is normal to experience some mild discomfort. However, sore spots occasionally develop and these must be corrected by the denturist. Many patients require follow-up visits for denture adjustments during the first few weeks, so be assured that this is a very common and expected experience.

  3. Feeling of Fullness in the Mouth
    As you have introduced a foreign body into your mouth (the new denture), this temporary condition is perfectly natural. As you adjust to your new dentures, this feeling of fullness will pass.

  4. Speech difficulties
    Difficulty speaking may be caused by the presence of foreign material in the mouth, and patience is necessary during the adjustment period as your mouth and tongue adjust to the new dentures. Your speech can be improved considerably if you take some time to read aloud, paying special attention to your pronunciation and repeating words that you have difficulty saying clearly.

  5. Facial Expression
    Your facial expression may seem a little different at first. Your facial muscles and lips will soon relax to their natural position.

  6. Excessive saliva production
    Your saliva glands naturally become overactive when any foreign body is placed in the mouth. In the beginning, your dentures will be recognized by the mouth as a foreign body, but in a few days will be accepted as a normal presence. Any excessive saliva will decrease to normal amounts within a few days.

  7. Function or chewing ability
    Learning to chew satifactorily with new dentures can take up to six months. The tongue, cheek and lip muscles must be trained to keep the dentures in place during chewing and speaking. Before you begin to chew with your new dentures, it is best to be fully adjusted to all other phases of adjustment. If you do not wait until your dentures are comfortable before you use them to chew you will be disapointed with the results. Once you begin to use your new dentures to chew, try to be persistent and patient with the rate of your progress. The successful use of your dentures depends on you and the effort you put forth to master them. It will take practice, patience and determination. Begin with very small bites of soft food and chew very softly. In biting into harder foods such as apples or carrots, try pressing smaller pieces against your front teeth and at the same time breaking the food off by twisting your hand.

To keep your lower denture in place as much as possible while chewing, try using an up and down chewing motion, keeping side to side jaw movements to a minimum. Place small portions of food on both sides of your mouth at the same time. And limit your tongue movements until your chewing efforts become efficient.

Initially smaller particles of food may get under your dentures, but in time this condition will correct itself.

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10. What are the most common denture related problems?

Poor fit: loose dentures can cause excessive friction between the oral tissues and the dentures, resulting in sore spots that may become infected.

Poor chewing ability: A denture that does not fit properly can make the denture wearer unable to chew food properly. Certain harder to chew foods may be eliminated from the diet because of poor chewing ability. In both cases digestion and overall good health and nutrition are affected.

Unnatural aesthetics: In a lot of cases extremely white teeth with a "bleached" color do not match an individuals personal coloring and are a tell tale sign that a person is wearing a denture, as are overly dark teeth.

Premature aging: Inferior dentures wear excessively and can lead to wrinkles around the mouth and cheeks.

Joint and jaw disorders: Excessive denture tooth wear may cause improper support which can upset the jaw mechanism. Commonly this can lead to temporomandibular joint disorder.

Bad oral hygine: Improperly processed dentures can harbor bacteria, which can weaken the denture and lead to bad breath. Food particles caught in the denture can also lead to bad breath.

Emotional and psychological distress: Ill fitting or unnatural looking dentures can make it difficult and embarrassing to speak, eat and socialize.

Problems with your dentures can affect your overall quality of life. Our experience and expertise in denture technology and use of the best materials allows us to eliminate these problems and make a positive impact on your quality of life.

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